Voters overwhelmingly favor schools, core functions over wind subsidies

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More than four out of five Oklahoma voters would prefer the state’s tax dollars be spent on education rather than costly wind subsidies, according to the latest SoonerPoll.

More than 92 percent of respondents said they were concerned about the state’s ability to fund core government functions while it is facing a nearly $900 million budget shortfall. The same percentage claimed education as their top concern, followed closely by public safety and funding for roads and bridges.

“I expected to find Oklahoma likely voters more supportive of funding schools and other core government functions than wind subsidies,” said Bill Shapard, SoonerPoll’s chief analyst, “but I did not expect the numbers to be this big.”

[QUESTION] Oklahoma is facing a budget shortfall of nearly $900 million this year, after dealing with a $1.3 billion budget hole last year. How concerned are you about the state’s ability to fund core government functions like education, public safety and repairs for roads and bridges?

1. Very concerned 71.6
2. Somewhat concerned 21.1
COMBINED CONCERN 92.7
3. Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 1.9
4. Somewhat unconcerned 4.2
5. Strongly unconcerned 1.1
COMBINED UNCONCERN 5.3

The poll showed nearly 83 percent of voters think wind subsidies should be eliminated by the end of the year, since Oklahoma already has surpassed its renewable energy goal.

[QUESTION] Oklahoma has offered subsidies to wind developers since 2003, helping the state because No. 4 in the nation for wind energy. Oklahoma already has surpassed its 15 percent renewable energy goal, while out-of-state wind companies continue to collect on those subsidies. Do you think it’s time to end these costly payouts?

1. Yes, right away 61.6
2. At the end of the year 21.3
COMBINED BY END OF YEAR OR SOONER 82.9
3. No 16.5
4. Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 0.6

More than 82 percent of Oklahoma voters said lawmakers should choose to fund education over continuing to subsidize wind development, according to the poll. Support for education was high among both Republicans (81 percent) and Democrats (84 percent).

Eighty-five percent of respondents from the Oklahoma City area favored education over wind subsidies, as did 77 percent in the Tulsa area resident and almost 84 percent of those in the rest of the state.

The number of respondents favoring education exceeded 78 percent in all five U.S. Congressional districts, led by Rep. Frank Lucas’ western Oklahoma district at 88 percent.

The poll also showed that nearly 84 percent of respondents believe Oklahoma teachers, whose average salaries are among the lowest in the nation, deserve to be paid more. More than 76 percent said Oklahoma should spend more money on education.

Lastly, Oklahoma likely voters also want fairness in the taxation of energy production in the state. When asked if the state should generate tax revenues from wind production like it does from oil and gas production, 83 percent believed it should.

[QUESTION] Did you know there is no production tax on wind in Oklahoma? Should Oklahoma generate tax revenue from wind production, like it does from oil and natural gas production?

1. Yes 83.5
2. No 7.7
4. Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 8.8

“Any taxpayer funds spent toward the development of one industry, in this case, the huge subsidies to out-of-state wind companies, is less monies that can be spent toward education and other core government functions. It’s as simple as that.” said Shapard. “Our elected leaders at the state capitol, who seem to only be talking about raising new taxes or cutting government spending, have missed this point.”

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters and were written by SoonerPoll.com.  The poll were commissioned by the Windfall Coalition.

The scientific study was conducted from March 3 – 21, 2017 with 605 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 3.82 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Voters overwhelmingly oppose new taxes on services for home remodel or ownership

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According to the most recent SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll of the state’s likely voters, an overwhelming 92.8 percent oppose newly proposed sales taxes on the purchase of a new home.  When voters who opposed were told the increased revenues would better fund government services and eliminate the sales tax on groceries, these voters were still overwhelmingly opposed to the new sales taxes by 74.4 percent.

Likely voters were also asked about proposed new sales taxes on home remodel related services and industries such as plumbing and heating and air conditioning.  Another overwhelming 77.8 percent opposed the addition of these new sales taxes.

[QUESTION] Do you SUPPORT or OPPOSE increasing the cost of home ownership by adding a sales tax to mortgage, closing costs, and other services associated with purchasing a new home?

1. Strongly support 2.5
2. Somewhat support 2.5
COMBINED SUPPORT 5.0
3. Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 2.3
4. Somewhat oppose 20.6
5. Strongly oppose 72.2
COMBINED OPPOSE 92.8

Governor Mary Fallin has led the charge in adding a new sales tax to an extensive list of services to fill a more than $900 million state budget deficit this year, due in large part to a significant drop in oil and gas prices.  The governor has contended that our economy has become a more “service-oriented” economy and that state revenues cannot solely survive on taxing products only.

“Increasing property taxes in Oklahoma is extremely unpopular,” said Bill Shapard, founder of SoonerPoll, “and it’s not surprising that Oklahomans find taxing services related to remodeling their home or property — or purchasing a new home for that matter — very unpopular as well.”

Further analysis indicates that not a single demographical subset found the proposed new sales taxes with regard to home remodel or ownership even remotely attractive.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.  These questions were commissioned by the Oklahoma State Homebuilders Association and the Oklahoma Association of Realtors.

The scientific study was conducted from February 15-21, 2017 with 408 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.59 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Oklahomans oppose universities barring opposing views, speech from its campus

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NEW YORK - OCTOBER 10: Protesters rally at Teachers College at Columbia University October 10, 2007, in New York City. Black professor Madonna Constantine discovered a hangman's noose on her office door at the prestigious college yesterday sparking anger at the campus. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Oklahoman likely voters do not like the idea of barring free speech from Oklahoma’s college campuses, regardless of the views expressed, according to the most recent SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

Fifty-five percent of Oklahomans opposed public colleges prohibiting free speech even if the views expressed disagreed with those of the college’s leadership or student body.
Only 25 percent supported it and another 20 percent did not have an opinion.

Just yesterday, left-wing rioters took to the campus of the University of California at Berkley in order to disrupt a conservative guest speaker scheduled to speak with whose views they disagree.

Opposition to free speech, particularly conservative opinions, has been building for some time on college campuses nationwide,” said Bill Shapard, founder of SoonerPoll.  “The poll results show Oklahomans want the free expression of both liberal and conservatives views and oppose the stifling by the college’s leadership or student body of either one.”

[QUESTION] Do you SUPPORT or OPPOSE public colleges or universities, such as OU or OSU, from BARRING speeches or guest lectures on their campuses because they engage in speech or opinions with which the institution’s leadership or student body disagrees?

1. Strongly support 13.1
2. Somewhat support 11.7
COMBINED SUPPORT 24.8
3. Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 20.1
4. Somewhat oppose 25.8
5. Strongly oppose 29.2
COMBINED OPPOSE 55.0

Opposition to barring free speech on college campuses was high for Republicans at 61 percent, yet only a plurality of Democrats at 45.8 percent.  One in four Democrats did not have an opinion and 29.8 percent supported barring opposing views being expressed on campuses.

Opposition was strongest among Independents with 68.1 percent.

A majority of opposition was seen among conservatives, moderates and liberals, at 56.2 percent, 51.3 percent, and 58 percent respectively.

Among age group subsets, a majority of was opposed to barring free speech on campuses, except for those, interestingly, of college age and slightly older from 25 to 44, where only a plurality 42 to 48 percent opposed barring free speech.

Men were more likely to oppose barring free speech on campus with 62.6 percent, whereas only a plurality, 47.2 percent, of women were opposed.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

The scientific study was conducted from December 19-21, 2016 with 440 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.60 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Oklahomans favor reducing or eliminating wind tax credits in order to fund teacher pay raises

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According to the most recent Quarterly Poll from SoonerPoll, a plurality of Oklahoma likely voters believe reducing or eliminating corporate tax credits and subsidies for wind energy companies is the best place to start in funding teacher pay raises.

Legislators say they got the message from last year’s election about raising teacher pay,” said Bill Shapard, founder of SoonerPoll.  “These poll results tell them where voters believe the funding should come from.”

Nearly one in three voters believed funding for increased teacher salaries should come from reducing the non-teaching workforce costs in Oklahoma’s higher education system.

Only 14 percent of likely voters believed teacher pay raises should come from increased taxes.

“These poll results show Oklahomans want legislators to look other places before trying to raise revenues from increased taxes,” said Shapard.

[QUESTION] Many Oklahoma lawmakers have expressed a desire to enact a teacher pay raise during the 2017 legislative session. However, the legislature will likely be facing a significant state budget gap. To help fund teacher pay raises, which of the following options would you prefer?

1. Reduce or eliminate corporate tax credits and subsidies for wind energy companies 42.1
2. Reduce non-teaching workforce costs in Oklahoma’s higher education system 29.7
3. Increase taxes 14.0
4. Do not raise teacher salaries at this time 14.3

A plurality of Republicans, Democrats and Independents all favored cutting tax credits and subsidies to wind energy as their first choice for funding teacher pay increases, including conservatives, moderates and liberals as well.

Republicans were more likely than Democrats in wanting to make raising taxes to fund teacher pay increases a last resort.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll, which was commissioned by the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs (OCPA).

The scientific study was conducted from December 19-21, 2016 with 440 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.60 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Oklahoma City voters strongly favor OKC firefighters in contract negotiations

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In a complete report released today, poll results indicate Oklahoma City likely voters would strongly favor the Oklahoma City firefighters in any contract dispute that might occur.

DOWNLOAD A COPY OF THE REPORT HERE

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, conducted the poll which was commissioned by the Oklahoma City firefighters local 157.

The scientific study was conducted from December 7-28, 2016 with 419 likely Oklahoma City voters selected at random from a dual-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and gender in order to reflect the Oklahoma City likely voter population for a special election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of Oklahoma City special election voters. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.79 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Oklahomans believe gun-free zones make people LESS safe

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According to the most recent SoonerPoll Quarterly, more than two-thirds of Oklahoma likely voters believe areas designated as gun-free zones make citizens LESS safe, which runs contrary to reason for establishing gun-free zones in the first place.

Only 23.6 percent believed gun-free zones make citizens more safe and another eight percent didn’t have an opinion.

“As the number of mass shootings have increased, some in areas specifically designated as gun-free zones, Oklahomans are not seeing gun-free zones as a solution to making people safer,” said Bill Shapard, founder of SoonerPoll.com.

 [QUESTION] Gun free zones are areas where the use or possession of firearms is considered a crime.  Supporters of gun free zones believe such areas create greater safety for all by banning all guns in the area, whereas opponents believe criminals or mass murderers, who don’t follow laws anyway, view such areas as opportunities since no one would have a gun except them.  Do you believe that areas designated as gun free zones make citizens MORE SAFE or LESS SAFE?

1. More safe 23.6
2. Less safe 68.2
3. Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 8.2

While over 82 percent of Republicans believed gun-free zones were less safe, a majority of Democrats (52.8 percent) also believed gun-free zones were less safe, and 59.3 percent of Independents as well.

Gun-free zones were also not popular with self-identified conservatives, as 87.8 percent believed these zones were less safe, while 60 percent of moderates also agreed that gun-free zones are less safe.  Sixty percent of self-identified liberals, however, believed gun-free zones were MORE SAFE, and only 34 percent believed “less safe.”

Men were nine points more likely to view gun-free zones as less safe than women, 72.7 percent to 63.7 percent, and no significant differences were observed when results were analyzed by age, income, race, or education.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

The scientific study was conducted from December 19-21, 2016 with 440 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.60 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Oklahomans support denying federal funds to sanctuary cities

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Oklahoma voters oppose sanctuary cities that refuse to cooperate with the federal government in enforcing current immigration laws, according to the latest SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll, and want to deny them federal funding for doing so.

Among likely voters in Oklahoma, 56.7 percent support the federal government denying federal monies to cities that refuse to cooperate.  Another 9 percent were undecided, 35.3 percents opposed the denial of federal funding.

 [QUESTION] A sanctuary city is a city in the United States that has adopted a policy of protecting immigrants who have come to this country illegally and are now living, by not prosecuting them solely for violating federal immigration laws. The term applies generally to cities that do not use municipal funds or resources to enforce federal immigration laws, and usually forbid police or municipal employees from inquiring about a person’s immigration status. Knowing this, do you SUPPORT or OPPOSE the federal government in providing funding to cities to enforce federal immigration laws and conversely denying federal monies to sanctuary cities that refuse to enforce federal immigration laws?

1. Strongly support 41.7
2. Somewhat support 14.0
3. Neutral/no opinion/Refused [DNR] 9.0
4. Somewhat oppose 10.7
5. Strongly oppose 24.6

Support among Republicans was 59.6 percent and was somewhat expected, but even 55.4 percent of Democrats supported the denial of federal funds to sanctuary cities.

Self-identified conservatives also were the largest supporters, but a majority (52.9 percent) of self-identified moderates also supported it as well.  Self-identified liberals, however, were split with 44.8 percent supporters and 41.2 percent opposing the denial of federal funds.  Liberals were also more likely to be neutral or have no opinion at 14 percent.

There were no significant differences observed when the poll results were analyzed by race, income, age, religious services attendance, or congressional district.

It has been reported that there are 200 sanctuary cities and counties in the United States today.  While there are no sanctuary cities in Oklahoma currently, Texas is attempting to outlaw them. In California, more and more cities are adopting resolutions to become one.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

The scientific study was conducted from December 19-21, 2016 with 440 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.60 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

New poll finds how Oklahomans would prioritize state spending

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In Oklahoma, a new state legislature has been sworn in and state legislators are right now working toward prioritizing state spending, particularly since they are facing another large budget shortfall.

According to the state’s likely voters, K-12 schools was selected as the most important area of state spending with nearly half of all respondents.  This result was more than twice the next highest selected priority of roads and other transportation expenses.

“Without a doubt, voters believe common education should be the highest spending priority in the upcoming legislative session,” said Bill Shapard, founder of SoonerPoll.com.

 The legislature is trying to prioritize areas of state spending.  Which of the following areas of spending would you prioritize as most important?

1. K-12 schools 46.7
2. Roads and other transportation expenses 19.6
3. Health care 19.2
4. Public safety 9.3
5. Colleges and universities 5.2

Also in the poll, transportation and health care spending were the second and third most selected as the highest priority, followed by public safety.

The area of spending selected the least among the choices given voters was “colleges and universities.”  Respondents were more than nine times more likely to select common education as a priority for state spending than colleges and universities.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll and was commissioned by the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs (OCPA).

The scientific study was conducted from December 19-21, 2016 with 440 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.60 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Poll: Teachers believe state should cut wind energy subsidies to better fund public education

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Nearly two-thirds of teachers in the state of Oklahoma believe corporate tax credits should be used to better fund public education, according an online poll of teachers conducted by SoonerPoll.  Just 11.8% of teachers disagreed.

During the 2016 legislative session earlier this year, several attempts to cut wind energy tax credits failed to get a vote, even though legislators grappled with more than $1 billion deficit and severe cuts to public education appropriations.

“It’s unfortunate, but it appears to teachers that our governor and state legislature prioritized the out-of-state wind energy producers over public schools,” said Bill Shapard, CEO of SoonerPoll.com.

 Our state should cut corporate tax credits, like subsidies for wind energy, and use those savings to better fund public education.  Do you: [PROBE: STRONGLY/SOMEWHAT]

1. Strongly agree 31.2
2. Somewhat agree 33.6
3. Don’t know/refused [DNR] 23.4
4. Somewhat disagree 9.2
5. Strongly disagree 2.6

Windwaste, a citizen advocacy group that opposes wind energy subsidies, believes subsidies given to wind farms could fund more than 1,200 new teachers. Oklahoma pays an average of $32,000 to a first-year teacher, yet gives $38,000 per turbine in tax subsidies to wind energy companies, according to the group.

In June, Secretary of Finance Preston L. Doerflinger reported that tax incentives for wind producers had once again exceeded the monthly collections of ALL corporate taxes paid into the General Revenue Fund (GRF), the key indicator of state government’s fiscal status and the predominant funding source for the annual appropriated state budget.

Teachers registered as Republican or Democrat were near equal in their support of eliminating wind energy tax subsidies, and teachers in rural areas were also strongly in support with 65.1% in combined agreement.

“These poll results might be expected,” said Shapard, “but pro-wind energy groups have made numerous claims this year that Oklahoma’s schools would greatly benefit from property taxes paid by wind producers. Teachers, who can see first-hand the impact funding has in the classroom, would seem to disagree.”

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, conducted the online poll of 458 Oklahoma teachers. The poll was commissioned by the Oklahoman.

The scientific study was conducted online September 29 – October 10, 2016 and respondents were selected at random among those with a teaching certificate in the state of Oklahoma. Teachers were identified by filtering out only teachers who were currently employed, retired, or looking for a teaching position in the state. The data was also filtered for those registered to vote and likely to vote in the November election.

The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.56 percent.

This year’s presidential winner in Oklahoma: Who’s disliked the least

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It’s safe to assume that, overall, a majority of Democrats find Donald Trump unfavorable and a majority of Republicans find Hillary Clinton unfavorable.  But, could the reason Clinton has not gained in polling among Oklahomans during the last six months be because a good portion of those within her own party do not like her?

The highest Clinton has been in the SoonerPoll is 35 percent, but most of the time she’s been around 30 percent or lower.  Unlike Trump, Clinton has not improved in her numbers over time.

So why is this? Perhaps the answer lies in the favorable ratings of the two candidates by those voters within the same party as each of the two candidates.

clinton-unfavorable

In the chart above, the level of strong favorability of voters toward the candidate of their own party is relatively equal, with Republicans slightly more “very favorable” toward Trump than Democrats toward Clinton. But, on the other end of the spectrum, Democrats are much more likely to be very unfavorable toward their own candidate, with nearly 75 percent of the total very unfavorability coming from Democrats toward Clinton.

That’s not to say that there are not Republicans who are unfavorable toward Trump, in fact Republicans lead Democrats in the “somewhat unfavorable” rating toward their own candidate.

“What we would be expecting from this chart is a close or near divide at 50 percent all the way across this chart if the two candidates were near equilibrium in their favorable and unfavorable ratings among voters in their own party,” said Bill Shapard, CEO of SoonerPoll.com.

“There is a pronounced strong unfavorability toward Hillary Clinton among likely voters in Oklahoma, more so among Democrats, that weights her down in the ballot,” Shapard said. “The bottom line is, Clinton has to contend with about one-in-three Democrats — those within her own party in Oklahoma — who find her very unfavorable.  Until that is rectified, her ballot numbers are not going up anytime soon.”

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll and was commissioned by the Oklahoman.

The scientific study was conducted from October 18-20, 2016 with 530 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.26 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.