Oklahoma City voters want to save Oklahoma City schools

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When it comes to considering the continuation of city taxes like the popular MAPS projects, Oklahoma City likely voters want to include funding for the city’s public schools which have experienced per pupil decreases in state funding in recent years.

 

According to the scientific study, 52 percent of likely Oklahoma City voters support using city funds to make up for state education cuts to the city’s public schools. Republicans were 61 percent of the poll’s sample and a plurality, 47 percent, supported the initiative, along with 60 percent of Democrats and 55 percent of Independents.

“Oklahoma City residents see the schools and the healthiness of the schools as critical to the vitality of the city as a whole,” said Bill Shapard, founder of SoonerPoll.  “If MAPS is going to continue, voters want the schools to be included.”

[QUESTION] Currently, funds collected by the city are NOT spent on schools or education, because it has been the sole responsibility of the state government. However, with the state leading the nation in education cuts over the last 5 years, consideration is being given to using city funds to make up for education cuts for Oklahoma City schools. Consider a city proposal, which we will refer to as the “SAVE OKLAHOMA CITY SCHOOLS PROPOSAL” for the remainder of this survey. The funds raised under this proposal would allocate 50% of the funds for per-pupil spending such as school supplies and decreasing class size and 50% on non-administrative salaries such as teachers and support staff. Would you SUPPORT or OPPOSE this city-wide initiative or proposal?

1. Strongly support 22.9%
2. Somewhat support 29.0
COMBINED SUPPORT 51.9
3. Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 21.2
4. Somewhat oppose 13.6
5. Strongly oppose 13.4
COMBINED OPPOSE 27.0

Three methods of paying for the Save Oklahoma City Schools Proposal were offered to poll respondents for consideration.  One would raise funds with a temporary allocation of a quarter cent of the MAPS tax extension.  Another would temporarily restore the tax cuts implemented at the state level from 5 percent back to 5.25 percent for a three to four year period. The last suggested method was a temporary quarter percent corporate income tax increase.

All three methods were highly popular, with 63 percent supported a portion of the MAPS tax, 60 percent supporting temporarily restoring state tax cuts, and 61 percent supporting a temporary corporate income tax.

“Oklahoma voters are typically adverse to tax increases, but this aversion is being overcome when they see the schools in their neighborhoods struggle with less funding and poorly paid teachers,” Shapard said, who went on to note that again the legislature failed to pass a teacher pay raise during this last session which is overwhelmingly popular with the electorate.

When city voters were asked to consider a list of various spending measures to be included in any MAPS extension, the Save Oklahoma City Schools Proposal was ranked third highest, just below Police and Fire departments and street maintenance and in a tie with new street construction.

Interestingly, the Save Oklahoma City Schools Proposal led in overall percentage of funding in comparison to all other spending measures when city voters were asked to allocate any MAPS extension monies.

[QUESTION] Of those selected, please tell us what percentage of the budget you would allocate to that spending priority.  Keep in mind the total must be equal to 100%. [READ IN ROTATED ORDER; AGGREGATE TOTALS PRESENTED]

1. The Save Oklahoma City Schools Proposal, which includes teacher and non-administrative pay. 32.7%
2. Police/Fire Department, which includes hiring additional police and firefighters. 30.5
3. Street construction, which includes street widenings and re-paving of existing streets 27.7
4. Street maintenance, which includes pothole repair. 27.4
5. Parks services, which includes the development of new parks, litter control and amenities for children. 19.2
6. Public transit, which includes adding buses and routes and extending days hours buses run. 18.2

Voters were also asked to choose between two proposed MAPS plans. One plan, known as MAPS for Neighborhoods, would allocate 50% toward city services, 25% toward the creation of new roads and re-paving old ones, and 25% toward the Save Oklahoma City Schools Proposal.  The other is the plan currently being proposed by Mayor Mick Cornett, which allocates 25% toward city services and 75% toward the creation of new streets and re-paving of old ones.  By a more than two-to-one margin, Oklahoma City likely voter’s choice was the MAPS for Neighborhoods, 54.4 percent to 21.8 percent.

[QUESTION] If you had to choose between these two proposed plans, the Mayor’s Plan for MAPS and the MAPS for Neighborhoods, which would you SUPPORT? [OFFER THE TWO PLANS IN ROTATED ORDER]

1. I would support the Mayor’s Plan 21.8%
2. I would support the MAPS for Neighborhoods plan 54.4
3. Neither 12.5
3. Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 11.4

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma City likely voters and were written by SoonerPoll.com.  These poll questions were commissioned by City Councilor Ed Shadid.

The scientific study was conducted from May 5 – 21, 2017 with 440 likely Oklahoma City voters for a September election, selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and gender in order to reflect the Oklahoma City likely voter population for a September election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma City likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.66 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Oklahomans soundly still believe government is wasting taxpayer monies

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The message from state agencies and legislators over the last few months has been, for the most part, that the state has cut too much from government budgets and there is no more wasteful spending now.  But, that isn’t what Oklahomans think.

According to the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll, an overwhelming 87 percent of likely voting Oklahomans believe more efficiency can still be found in state government spending.  About six in ten likely voters strongly agreed.

[QUESTION] More efficiency can still be found in state government spending.

1. Strongly agree 60.7
2. Somewhat agree 26.4
COMBINED AGREE 87.1
3. Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 5.4
4. Somewhat disagree 5.2
5. Strongly disagree 2.3
COMBINED DISAGREE 7.5

While there was very strong agreement among Republicans in the poll, 58 percent of Democrats “strongly agreed” that more efficiency can still be found, with 87 percent is combined agreement.  Even among Independents, 68 percent agreed with 55 percent with strong agreement.

“Government has the perception of wasting taxpayers monies among all Oklahomans, regardless of party affiliation,” said Bill Shapard, founder of SoonerPoll. “Whether it’s true or not, the perception is there and in the near future, legislators and agency heads are going to have a tough time convincing them otherwise.”

Recent legislation headed to the governor’s desk for signature would conduct an independent comprehensive performance audits on the twenty agencies that receive the most in state appropriations.

“While many believe the audits will expose that agencies have suffered too much under budget cuts, voters will have a tough time believing them,” said Shapard, the senior analyst on the poll.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

The scientific study was conducted from February 15-21, 2017 with 408 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.59 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Oklahomans believe wind industry should pay sales tax like everyone else

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Wind companies currently doing business in Oklahoma are exempt from paying sales tax on new turbines but, according to the most recent SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll, Oklahomans question whether they should be exempt in the first place.

A combined 83.9 percent of likely voting Oklahomans supported the wind industry paying sales tax. Of that, 60 percent strongly supported the measure, and another 23.9 percent somewhat supported it.

[QUESTION] Currently, the wind industry is exempt from sales tax and, if they were charged sales tax like other businesses were in the state, the state could raise 67.5 million this year.  Knowing this, do you SUPPORT or OPPOSE new legislation that would require the wind industry to pay sales tax?

1. Strongly support 60.0
2. Somewhat support 23.9
COMBINED SUPPORT 83.9
3. Don’t know/No opinion/Refused [DNR] 6.4
4. Somewhat oppose 5.0
5. Strongly oppose 4.8
COMBINED OPPOSE 9.8

The average turbine costs about $2 million, which would generate about $90,000 in revenue under Oklahoma’s statewide 4.5-cent sales tax if wind companies were required to pay sales tax. Counties where wind farms are located would receive added revenue as well, depending on the size of their sales taxes.

According to Southwest Power Pool data, wind developers are expected to add about 750 new turbines in Oklahoma this year, which would mean more than $67 million in sales tax revenue for the state.

Republicans were more likely to support the requirement of wind companies paying sales tax than Democrats or Independents, although 72.4 percent of Democrats supported it and 81.6 percent of Independents.  A combined 93.7 percent of Republicans supported the requirement.

“Oklahomans are aware that the state is in nearly a $1 billion budget deficit,” said Bill Shapard, founder of SoonerPoll, “and every government exemption and giveaway is being scrutinized.”

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters and were written by SoonerPoll.com.  These poll questions were commissioned by the Windfall Coalition.

The scientific study was conducted from April 25 – May 1, 2017 with 409 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.84 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

After first 100 days, majority of Oklahoma likely voters still like Trump

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One hundred days into his new administration, President Trump has the backing of a majority of Oklahoma likely voters, according to the most recent SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

Fifty-seven percent of likely voting Oklahomans had a favorable impression of him, while just more than one in three had an unfavorable opinion. This result is a few points lower than his win percentage in the state last November but within the margin of error of the poll.

“It’s probably safe to say that President Trump isn’t broadening his base after the first 100 days,” said Bill Shapard, founder of SoonerPoll.com, “But, those that voted for him seem to be sticking with him for the time being.”

By about this time into the first 100 days of former President Obama, Oklahomans had already begun to give up on him.

[QUESTION] I am going to read to you a list of individuals. For each one, please tell me whether you have a FAVORABLE or UNFAVORABLE opinion. [PROBE: VERY/SOMEWHAT]  DONALD TRUMP

1. Very favorable 30.9
2. Somewhat favorable 26.4
COMBINED FAVORABLE 57.3
3. Don’t know/No opinion/Refused [DNR] 7.3
4. Somewhat unfavorable 9.5
5. Very unfavorable 26.0
COMBINED UNFAVORABLE 35.5

Looking further into the poll results, 78.2 percent of Republicans had a favorable opinion of Trump, while just under half, 49.2 percent, of Independents had one.  A little more than a third of Democrats, 34.9 percent, had a favorable opinion, but 58.7 percent had an unfavorable one.

Trump, like Obama before him, is still very polarizing when is comes to the views of Oklahomans by political ideology. Among self-identified Conservatives, 82.2 percent had a favorable view, while 77.5 percent of self-identified Liberals had an unfavorable one.  Moderates were more split but a majority, 54.8 percent, had an unfavorable view of Trump and 36.3 percent had a favorable one.

There was also significant differences among likely voting Oklahomans by age. While those 65 years and old had a much more favorable opinion at 64.9 percent, those under the age of 35 were much more split with slightly less than half favorable, yet still a plurality, towards him and 45 percent unfavorable.

“At this point only time will tell whether Trump can grow this support among more moderate voters and/or more younger voters,” Shapard said.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

The scientific study was conducted from April 25 – May 1, 2017 with 409 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.84 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

How unpopular is Governor Fallin? Kevin Durant is more popular.

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One might think that former Oklahoma City Thunder player Kevin Durant, who abandoned the team to join another one just to win a championship, would be one of the most unpopular people in the Oklahoma public eye right now. But, in this highly competitive sports state, that’s not the case, particularly in comparison to Governor Mary Fallin.

More than six out of ten likely voting Oklahomans find Fallin unfavorable, while less than one in five for Durant.

[QUESTION] I am going to read to you a list of individuals. For each one, please tell me whether you have a FAVORABLE or UNFAVORABLE opinion. [PROBE: VERY/SOMEWHAT]  MARY FALLIN

1. Very favorable 6.3
2. Somewhat favorable 24.8
COMBINED FAVORABLE 31.1
3. Don’t know/No opinion/Refused [DNR] 7.6
4. Somewhat unfavorable 21.2
5. Very unfavorable 40.1
COMBINED UNFAVORABLE 61.3

[QUESTION] KEVIN DURANT

1. Very favorable 12.7
2. Somewhat favorable 31.9
COMBINED FAVORABLE 44.6
3. Don’t know/No opinion/Refused [DNR] 38.0
4. Somewhat unfavorable 13.3
5. Very unfavorable 4.3
COMBINED UNFAVORABLE 17.6

Fifty-two percent of Republicans found Fallin unfavorable, while 71.6 percent of Democrats and 65.1 percent of Independents did as well.

A plurality of self-identified Conservatives, 46.9 percent, found Fallin unfavorable and 75.3 percent of Moderates.

Perhaps what could be even more saddening for the Governor is 64 percent of likely voters in the 5th Congressional District, a district she represented in Congress, viewed her unfavorably with 46.3 percent as “very unfavorable,” more than any other congressional district in the state.

[QUESTION] STATE LEGISLATURE

1. Very favorable 3.1
2. Somewhat favorable 27.1
COMBINED FAVORABLE 30.2
3. Don’t know/No opinion/Refused [DNR] 13.3
4. Somewhat unfavorable 28.3
5. Very unfavorable 28.3
COMBINED UNFAVORABLE 56.6

What may also be very telling about the depths of the Governor’s unpopularity is it’s comparison to the State Legislature as a whole which, like most evaluations of elected bodies, never scores well.

Only 56.6 percent of likely voting Oklahomans viewed the State Legislature unfavorably compared to 61.3 percent for Fallin. While only 28 percent viewed the State Legislature as “very unfavorable,” a full 40 percent viewed Fallin as “very unfavorable.”

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

The scientific study was conducted from April 25 – May 1, 2017 with 409 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.84 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Voters overwhelmingly favor schools, core functions over wind subsidies

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More than four out of five Oklahoma voters would prefer the state’s tax dollars be spent on education rather than costly wind subsidies, according to the latest SoonerPoll.

More than 92 percent of respondents said they were concerned about the state’s ability to fund core government functions while it is facing a nearly $900 million budget shortfall. The same percentage claimed education as their top concern, followed closely by public safety and funding for roads and bridges.

“I expected to find Oklahoma likely voters more supportive of funding schools and other core government functions than wind subsidies,” said Bill Shapard, SoonerPoll’s chief analyst, “but I did not expect the numbers to be this big.”

[QUESTION] Oklahoma is facing a budget shortfall of nearly $900 million this year, after dealing with a $1.3 billion budget hole last year. How concerned are you about the state’s ability to fund core government functions like education, public safety and repairs for roads and bridges?

1. Very concerned 71.6
2. Somewhat concerned 21.1
COMBINED CONCERN 92.7
3. Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 1.9
4. Somewhat unconcerned 4.2
5. Strongly unconcerned 1.1
COMBINED UNCONCERN 5.3

The poll showed nearly 83 percent of voters think wind subsidies should be eliminated by the end of the year, since Oklahoma already has surpassed its renewable energy goal.

[QUESTION] Oklahoma has offered subsidies to wind developers since 2003, helping the state because No. 4 in the nation for wind energy. Oklahoma already has surpassed its 15 percent renewable energy goal, while out-of-state wind companies continue to collect on those subsidies. Do you think it’s time to end these costly payouts?

1. Yes, right away 61.6
2. At the end of the year 21.3
COMBINED BY END OF YEAR OR SOONER 82.9
3. No 16.5
4. Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 0.6

More than 82 percent of Oklahoma voters said lawmakers should choose to fund education over continuing to subsidize wind development, according to the poll. Support for education was high among both Republicans (81 percent) and Democrats (84 percent).

Eighty-five percent of respondents from the Oklahoma City area favored education over wind subsidies, as did 77 percent in the Tulsa area resident and almost 84 percent of those in the rest of the state.

The number of respondents favoring education exceeded 78 percent in all five U.S. Congressional districts, led by Rep. Frank Lucas’ western Oklahoma district at 88 percent.

The poll also showed that nearly 84 percent of respondents believe Oklahoma teachers, whose average salaries are among the lowest in the nation, deserve to be paid more. More than 76 percent said Oklahoma should spend more money on education.

Lastly, Oklahoma likely voters also want fairness in the taxation of energy production in the state. When asked if the state should generate tax revenues from wind production like it does from oil and gas production, 83 percent believed it should.

[QUESTION] Did you know there is no production tax on wind in Oklahoma? Should Oklahoma generate tax revenue from wind production, like it does from oil and natural gas production?

1. Yes 83.5
2. No 7.7
4. Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 8.8

“Any taxpayer funds spent toward the development of one industry, in this case, the huge subsidies to out-of-state wind companies, is less monies that can be spent toward education and other core government functions. It’s as simple as that.” said Shapard. “Our elected leaders at the state capitol, who seem to only be talking about raising new taxes or cutting government spending, have missed this point.”

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters and were written by SoonerPoll.com.  The poll were commissioned by the Windfall Coalition.

The scientific study was conducted from March 3 – 21, 2017 with 605 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 3.82 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Voters overwhelmingly oppose new taxes on services for home remodel or ownership

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According to the most recent SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll of the state’s likely voters, an overwhelming 92.8 percent oppose newly proposed sales taxes on the purchase of a new home.  When voters who opposed were told the increased revenues would better fund government services and eliminate the sales tax on groceries, these voters were still overwhelmingly opposed to the new sales taxes by 74.4 percent.

Likely voters were also asked about proposed new sales taxes on home remodel related services and industries such as plumbing and heating and air conditioning.  Another overwhelming 77.8 percent opposed the addition of these new sales taxes.

[QUESTION] Do you SUPPORT or OPPOSE increasing the cost of home ownership by adding a sales tax to mortgage, closing costs, and other services associated with purchasing a new home?

1. Strongly support 2.5
2. Somewhat support 2.5
COMBINED SUPPORT 5.0
3. Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 2.3
4. Somewhat oppose 20.6
5. Strongly oppose 72.2
COMBINED OPPOSE 92.8

Governor Mary Fallin has led the charge in adding a new sales tax to an extensive list of services to fill a more than $900 million state budget deficit this year, due in large part to a significant drop in oil and gas prices.  The governor has contended that our economy has become a more “service-oriented” economy and that state revenues cannot solely survive on taxing products only.

“Increasing property taxes in Oklahoma is extremely unpopular,” said Bill Shapard, founder of SoonerPoll, “and it’s not surprising that Oklahomans find taxing services related to remodeling their home or property — or purchasing a new home for that matter — very unpopular as well.”

Further analysis indicates that not a single demographical subset found the proposed new sales taxes with regard to home remodel or ownership even remotely attractive.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.  These questions were commissioned by the Oklahoma State Homebuilders Association and the Oklahoma Association of Realtors.

The scientific study was conducted from February 15-21, 2017 with 408 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.59 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Oklahomans oppose universities barring opposing views, speech from its campus

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NEW YORK - OCTOBER 10: Protesters rally at Teachers College at Columbia University October 10, 2007, in New York City. Black professor Madonna Constantine discovered a hangman's noose on her office door at the prestigious college yesterday sparking anger at the campus. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Oklahoman likely voters do not like the idea of barring free speech from Oklahoma’s college campuses, regardless of the views expressed, according to the most recent SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

Fifty-five percent of Oklahomans opposed public colleges prohibiting free speech even if the views expressed disagreed with those of the college’s leadership or student body.
Only 25 percent supported it and another 20 percent did not have an opinion.

Just yesterday, left-wing rioters took to the campus of the University of California at Berkley in order to disrupt a conservative guest speaker scheduled to speak with whose views they disagree.

Opposition to free speech, particularly conservative opinions, has been building for some time on college campuses nationwide,” said Bill Shapard, founder of SoonerPoll.  “The poll results show Oklahomans want the free expression of both liberal and conservatives views and oppose the stifling by the college’s leadership or student body of either one.”

[QUESTION] Do you SUPPORT or OPPOSE public colleges or universities, such as OU or OSU, from BARRING speeches or guest lectures on their campuses because they engage in speech or opinions with which the institution’s leadership or student body disagrees?

1. Strongly support 13.1
2. Somewhat support 11.7
COMBINED SUPPORT 24.8
3. Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 20.1
4. Somewhat oppose 25.8
5. Strongly oppose 29.2
COMBINED OPPOSE 55.0

Opposition to barring free speech on college campuses was high for Republicans at 61 percent, yet only a plurality of Democrats at 45.8 percent.  One in four Democrats did not have an opinion and 29.8 percent supported barring opposing views being expressed on campuses.

Opposition was strongest among Independents with 68.1 percent.

A majority of opposition was seen among conservatives, moderates and liberals, at 56.2 percent, 51.3 percent, and 58 percent respectively.

Among age group subsets, a majority of was opposed to barring free speech on campuses, except for those, interestingly, of college age and slightly older from 25 to 44, where only a plurality 42 to 48 percent opposed barring free speech.

Men were more likely to oppose barring free speech on campus with 62.6 percent, whereas only a plurality, 47.2 percent, of women were opposed.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

The scientific study was conducted from December 19-21, 2016 with 440 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.60 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Oklahomans favor reducing or eliminating wind tax credits in order to fund teacher pay raises

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According to the most recent Quarterly Poll from SoonerPoll, a plurality of Oklahoma likely voters believe reducing or eliminating corporate tax credits and subsidies for wind energy companies is the best place to start in funding teacher pay raises.

Legislators say they got the message from last year’s election about raising teacher pay,” said Bill Shapard, founder of SoonerPoll.  “These poll results tell them where voters believe the funding should come from.”

Nearly one in three voters believed funding for increased teacher salaries should come from reducing the non-teaching workforce costs in Oklahoma’s higher education system.

Only 14 percent of likely voters believed teacher pay raises should come from increased taxes.

“These poll results show Oklahomans want legislators to look other places before trying to raise revenues from increased taxes,” said Shapard.

[QUESTION] Many Oklahoma lawmakers have expressed a desire to enact a teacher pay raise during the 2017 legislative session. However, the legislature will likely be facing a significant state budget gap. To help fund teacher pay raises, which of the following options would you prefer?

1. Reduce or eliminate corporate tax credits and subsidies for wind energy companies 42.1
2. Reduce non-teaching workforce costs in Oklahoma’s higher education system 29.7
3. Increase taxes 14.0
4. Do not raise teacher salaries at this time 14.3

A plurality of Republicans, Democrats and Independents all favored cutting tax credits and subsidies to wind energy as their first choice for funding teacher pay increases, including conservatives, moderates and liberals as well.

Republicans were more likely than Democrats in wanting to make raising taxes to fund teacher pay increases a last resort.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll, which was commissioned by the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs (OCPA).

The scientific study was conducted from December 19-21, 2016 with 440 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.60 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Oklahoma City voters strongly favor OKC firefighters in contract negotiations

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In a complete report released today, poll results indicate Oklahoma City likely voters would strongly favor the Oklahoma City firefighters in any contract dispute that might occur.

DOWNLOAD A COPY OF THE REPORT HERE

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, conducted the poll which was commissioned by the Oklahoma City firefighters local 157.

The scientific study was conducted from December 7-28, 2016 with 419 likely Oklahoma City voters selected at random from a dual-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and gender in order to reflect the Oklahoma City likely voter population for a special election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of Oklahoma City special election voters. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.79 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.