Oklahoman: One in four Oklahoma voters would vote to secede if Clinton were elected, poll finds

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By Silas Allen, The Oklahoman

Just months after voters in the United Kingdom approved the so-called Brexit proposal, a growing number of Oklahomans want to stage their own Oklahexit, a new poll shows.

About one in four Oklahoma likely voters, including about two in five supporters of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, would want the state and Texas to secede from the Union if Hillary Clinton were elected president, the poll shows.

texassecede2

Supporters acknowledge the possibility of breaking with the United States is remote, but say they’re concerned about the direction the country is headed.

“I used to be an optimist. But that’s changed,” said Rick Larson, of Lawton. “I’m a realist now.”

Larson, 53, said he thinks a Clinton administration would be an extension of federal policies he thinks are damaging the country, including increased gun control and “redistribution of wealth.”

CLICK HERE FOR LINK TO 2009 TEXAS SECESSION POLL

Although he thinks Oklahoma and Texas could stand on their own as a single, separate nation, he doesn’t think they’d be alone.

“If that ball started rolling, I think there would be other states that would follow along,” he said.

Continued – Click here to read the entire Oklahoman article

If Texas were to vote in favor of secession from the United States, would you vote for or against Oklahoma secession if a secession state question was placed on the ballot?

1. For 25.9
2. Against 57.3
3. Don’t know/refused [DNR] 16.8

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

The scientific study was conducted from September 13-15, 2016 with 515 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.32 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Oklahoman: Clinton gains some ground on Trump in state, poll shows

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By Silas Allen, The Oklahoman

Donald Trump’s lead in Oklahoma’s presidential contest appears to be shrinking.

Although the Republican nominee still holds a substantial lead in the race, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton appears to be making up ground in the Sooner State, according to a poll conducted this week.

The poll shows 50.9 percent of respondents said they would vote for Trump if the election were held today, down from 53 percent in a poll conducted in late July.

In last week’s poll, 35.6 percent said they would support Clinton, up from 28.6 percent in July.

Another 6 percent saying they would vote for Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson, down from 7 percent in July. About 7.5 percent said they were undecided, down from 11.4 percent in July

Although Clinton still trails Trump by about 15 points, the poll suggests the state’s Democratic voters are beginning to coalesce around their party’s nominee, said Bill Shapard, founder of the Oklahoma City-based polling firm SoonerPoll.

“The Democrats are kind of coming home,” Shapard said.

Continued – Click here to read the entire Oklahoman article

Additional Take-aways from the poll results:

  • In the July poll, Trump was getting 26.1 percent of the Democrat vote.  Today, he’s getting only 19.5 percent.
  • More Democrats and Republicans are more decided on a candidate than in July.  For Democrats, 8.4 percent are undecided compared to 14.7 percent in July.  Republicans undecided dropped from 8.5 to just 6.4 percent.
  • Independent voters still heavily favor Trump over Clinton, 48.1 to 26.5 percent, although Independent voters only make up about seven percent of the electorate.
  • There was also a large shift among self identified moderates.  Clinton improved 8.3 percent among moderates, from 41.8 percent in July to 50.1 percent today.  Trump fell from 36.6 percent in July to 22 percent in this month’s poll.  Moderates are one-in-three voters on election day.
  • Greatest increase since July was among self-identified liberal voters, where just 67.8 percent supported Clinton in July with 8.6 percent undecided and another 8.7 percent supporting Gary Johnson.  Now, 86 percent support Clinton, only 2.1 percent are undecided, and Johnson with no support of liberal respondents.
  • The move away from Johnson is also a contributing factor in this poll.  Johnson was receiving 7.2 percent of self-identified conservatives, now just 3.7 percent. Among Republicans, 8.8 percent supported Johnson in July, now just 4.6 percent.
  • Furthermore, 63.7 percent of Johnson supporters in the poll said they were “less” enthusiast about voting this year compared to prior years, more than twice the amount among supporters of Trump or Clinton.
  • It should also be noted that 71.2 percent of those undecided also indicated they were less enthusiast about voting this year compared to elections past.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

The scientific study was conducted from September 13-15, 2016 with 515 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, political party, and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.32 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

News9/Newson6: Oklahomans rate the state’s public schools a C+

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As a part of an in-depth series entitled EDUCATE OKLAHOMA, News9 and Newson6 commissioned SoonerPoll to ask Oklahoma likely voters a series of questions to gauge their opinion of public education in our state.

While Oklahomans handed out more “F”s than “A”s in their overall evaluation of public education in the state, the overall mean was a “C+”.

Thinking about k through 12 public education in our state today.  What grade would you give our schools in the quality of education they are providing?

1. A 7.8
2. B 29.2
3. C 36.9
4. D 17.7
5. F 8.5

Continued – Click here to read and watch the entire News9/Newson6 story

Additional Take-aways from the poll results:

  • Democrats were twice as likely to give public education an “A” as Republicans, but Democrats were also more likely to give out more “F”s, 8.9% to 7.4% for Republicans.
  • While a plurality of Republicans (42%) gave it a “C”, Democrats were nearly split between a “B” and a “C” with 31.7% and 31.1% respectively.
  • While self-identifed liberals were much more likely to give an “A” than an “F”, and very conservatives were more likely to give an “F” than an “A”, self-identified moderates and somewhat conservatives were more likely to mirror the overall average of a “C+”.
  • Results only varied slightly between men and women, but interestingly those voters age 18-34 were more likely to give a “D” grade and rate public schools lower than any other age group.
  • No significant differences were observed among those voters who did or did not have children under 18 years old living in their household, but those living in rural areas were more likely to rate public schools higher than those in urban or suburban areas.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, conducted the poll of Oklahoma likely voters, which was commissioned by News9 and Newson6.

The scientific study was conducted August 4, 2016 with 804 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a frame of landline telephone and conducted using IVR (Interactive Voice Response) technology. The sample was weighted by age, political party, congressional district and gender in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election.

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 3.46 percent.

 

Support for civil asset forfeiture reform on the rise

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Eh Wah, a Dallas resident who was born in Myanmar, challenged the seizure of more than $50,000 in cash by the Muskogee County Sheriff’s Department after he was pulled over for a traffic stop Feb. 27.

New data from SoonerPoll shows more Oklahomans than ever want to see Civil Asset Forfeiture reform. Support for reform is up to 73.7% in 2016 compared to 69.9% in 2015.

“These numbers clearly show Oklahomans are ready for lawmakers to act on Civil Asset Forfeiture,” says Bill Shapard, founder of SoonerPoll.  “Despite overwhelming public support during the 2016 legislative session, for whatever reason, leadership decided to brush the issue aside.  But, when almost 3 out of 4 Oklahomans want to see this issue addressed, lawmakers really need to pay attention.”

Sen. Kyle Loveless (R-Oklahoma City) has championed Civil Asset Forfeiture reform for more than a year and plans to re-introduce legislation in 2017.  Sen. Loveless has built a coalition spanning the political spectrum to push for substantive reform next year.

CAF_chart

“The work to reform Oklahoma’s Civil Asset Forfeiture system has always transcended partisan lines and this new poll only amplifies the call to end the practice of seizing money and property from Oklahomans who have not been convicted of any crime,” says Ryan Kiesel, Executive Director of the ACLU of Oklahoma.  “Oklahomans across the political spectrum understand that empowering the government to take a person’s property or money with very little, if any, actual cause is an affront to our fundamental rights and freedoms.”

Senator Loveless believes the burden now lies solely on the legislature to fix a broken system.

“This is not a law enforcement issue, this is an issue where government is wrong to take people’s property without proving anything in court,” Sen. Loveless says.  “Oklahomans of all walks of life, metro area to the smallest town, blue or red, left or right, regardless of where they come from Oklahomans want serious forfeiture reform.”

Senator Loveless has requested an interim study on Civil Asset Forfeiture.  A date for that hearing has not yet been scheduled.

 

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll, and was commissioned by the left-leaning Oklahoma Policy Institute and right-leaning Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs (OCPA).

The scientific study was conducted from July 20-25, 2016 with 398 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, congressional district and gender in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election.

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.91 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Oklahoman: Poll shows strong support for background checks on all gun purchases

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By Silas Allen, The Oklahoman

The overwhelming majority of Oklahomans would support a federal law requiring background checks for all gun purchases, according to a recent poll.

About 88 percent of all poll respondents said they would support such a measure. Although the measure was most popular among self-described liberals, more than three-quarters of conservatives said they would support such a law, according to the survey conducted by Oklahoma City-based SoonerPoll in cooperation with The
Oklahoman.

Do you SUPPORT or OPPOSE a federal law requiring background checks on all potential gun buyers? [PROBE: STONGLY/SOMEWHAT]

1. Stongly support 67.7
2. Somewhat support 20.2
3. Don’t know/refused [DNR] 3.4
4. Somewhat oppose 2.5
5. Strongly oppose 6.1

“I think that everybody that wants to purchase a gun needs to have a background check,” said Melody Barr, one of the poll’s respondents.

Barr, who described herself as a conservative Republican, said she doesn’t support additional gun control measures in general
but sees value in mandatory
background checks.

Although Barr, 50, of Bethany, said she recognizes that criminals likely will find a way to buy guns whether they’re legal or not, she thinks such a measure could prevent convicted felons or people who suffer from mental illnesses from buying guns.

Continued – Click here to read the entire Oklahoman article

TulsaWorld: Poll shows growing dissatisfaction with state lawmakers

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The Democratic chief executive has consistently scored low with Oklahoma voters and is generally viewed as deeply unpopular in the state. His numbers have improved slightly in recent months, but that is not why he’s suddenly in the same ranks as Fallin and the Republican-led Legislature when it comes to public perception.

In SoonerPoll.com’s statewide survey, Obama’s 36 percent favorable rating was 2 points better than the Legislature’s and only 3 points behind Fallin.

Continued – Click here to read the entire Tulsa World article

Additional Take-aways from the poll results:

Governor Fallin’s favorablity

  • Only 39.3% viewed Fallin favorably, which is a considerable decrease from 55% in November 2015, and substantial decrease from her high of 71% three years ago.
  • Now, only 55.7% of Republicans are favorable toward Fallin, down from 86% three years ago.
  • Among Democrats, Fallin was seen favorably by 57.5% three years ago.  Today, only 23.5% Democrats view Fallin favorably.
  • The fall among Independents is also substantial, from 65.8% three years ago to just 23.7% today.
  • Only 38% of likely voters in Oklahoma’s 5th congressional district, which Fallin represented in congress, viewed her favorably.

Evaluation of Fallin’s leadership skills

  • Just 10.9% of Republicans rated Fallin’s leadership skills as ‘excellent,’ 31.1% as ‘good,’ and a plurality of Republicans, 32.4%, as ‘fair.’  The remaining 23.1% of Republicans rated Fallin as ‘poor.’
  • Among Democrats, 60.6% rated Fallin as ‘poor,’ 18.7% as ‘fair,’ and only 12.8% as ‘good.’  Only 5.7% of Democrats rated Fallin as ‘excellent.’
  • Losing the conservative vote: While a plurality of self-identifed ‘very conservatives’ rated Fallin as ‘fair,’ a plurality (40.3%) of ‘somewhat conservatives’ rated her ‘poor.’
  • A majority of moderates in the state (56.1%) rated her leadership as ‘poor.’
  • A plurality, 45%, of likely voters in Fallin’s former 5th congressional seat rated her as ‘poor.’

Less competent than Henry or Keating

  • Likely voters were also asked to evaluate Fallin compared to former Democratic Governor Brad Henry, and former Republican Governor Frank Keating. Almost half, 49.6%, thought Fallin’s administration was less competent than Henry’s administration, and a near equal amount, 46.7%, thought Fallin’s administration was less competent than Keating’s.
  • 72.8% of Democrats thought Fallin was less competent than Henry, while only 11.1% thought she was more competent.
  • Among Republicans, results were mixed with 30.1% thinking Fallin was more competent than Henry, but 29.4% believed she was less competent than Democrat Henry.
  • While a majority of Democrats, 57.2% thought Fallin was less competent than Keating in comparing the two Republicans, a plurality (39.7%) of Republicans believed Fallin was less competent than Keating.  Only 15.9% of Republicans believed Fallin was more competent than Keating.
  • A plurality of both ‘somewhat conservatives’ and ‘very conservatives’ believed Fallin was less competent than Keating, 40.6% and 36.2% respectively.
  • Losing her base: 54% of Fallin’s former congressional district voters thought she as less competent than Henry and a stronger majority, 58.3%, believed she was less competent than former Governor Keating.

Obama’s had small hills and deep valleys with Oklahomans

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Obama Favorable

In Oklahoma, President Barack Obama’s had a bumpy ride.  His favorability, while never over 50 percent, started at a post-inaugural high and then fell rather quickly once Oklahomans evaluated the president’s political ideology as liberal and assessed that his policies could be harmful to Oklahoma’s oil and gas economy.

By the time the first mid-term election arrived, Obama had hit rock bottom with Oklahomans, and Republicans in the state were swept into every statewide office.

“I think it’s easy to say that Obama, who hasn’t been popular with Oklahomans from the start, will more than likely end that way,” said Bill Shapard, CEO of SoonerPoll, who went on to note that Republicans in Oklahoma have benefited greatly from Obama’s poor favorability.

What’s interesting is the latest upward trend witnessed over the last 18 months.

“This is part of the general trend we’ve witnessed nationwide,” said Keith Gaddie, professor and Department Chair of Political Science at the University of Oklahoma. “The president is having a good final year, with strong job recovery.”

This year’s presidential race may be having an impact as well, shifting the negative attention toward Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

“The negative tenor of the presidential campaign has left him room to be presidential and positive,” said Gaddie.

In the end, no more than just one-in-three Oklahomans has viewed Obama favorably over the course of his presidency absent the first six months.  Those that have paid the greatest price for Obama’s unfavorable rating in the state have been Oklahoma Democrats, whose party leadership haven’t tried to distance themselves at all from the unpopular president.

History may still view America’s first president positively.  If so, it will be without Oklahomans.

Majority of Oklahomans believe parents, not government, have the moral right to determine a child’s path

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WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 20: (FILE PHOTO) Shannon Woisnet, 7-years-old, from Cleveland, Ohio, holds up a sign in support of school vouchers in front of the U.S. Supreme Court February 20, 2002 in Washington, DC. The U.S. Supreme Court, in a 5-4 ruling, upheld the Cleveland, Ohio school voucher program June 27, 2002 which allows families to use publicly financed vouchers to send children to religious schools. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Oklahomans continue to express support for educational choice, according to the most recent Quarterly Poll from SoonerPoll.  More than half of Oklahoma likely voters favored school choice and parents’ moral right to determine their child’s education path.  Slightly more than one-third of likely voters opposed, believing that educational choice drains money from public schools.

“Time and time again, we’ve asked Oklahoma voters in a variety of way about the concept of school choice,” said Bill Shapard, CEO of SoonerPoll, “and a majority continue to support it.”

 Educational choice gives parents the right to use tax dollars associated with their child’s education to send their child to the public or private school which best serves their needs. Some people favor educational choice because they believe that parents, not government officials, have the moral right to determine a child’s path. Other people oppose educational choice because they believe it drains money from public schools and allows only a select few students to choose a different school.  Which viewpoint comes closest to your own?

1. FAVOR — parents have the moral right to choose 51.5
2. OPPOSE — it drains money from public schools 37.3
3. Undecided [DNR] 11.2

“For months, Oklahomans have heard the narrative that public schools need more money,” said Jonathan Small, president of the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs (OCPA). “Yet even when we are constantly told money is the answer to all problems, this SoonerPoll survey—which also shows the Boren tax increase proposal ahead comfortably—shows a majority of Oklahomans still favor educational choice. Oklahomans understand that education dollars should follow the student and want to see it become a reality.”

Among Republicans, 64.1 percent favored school choice, while only 24.2 percent oppose. Nearly four-in-ten Democrats supported it as well. Republicans make up just about half of the Oklahoma electorate with roughly 43 percent of Democrats.

Support for school choice was higher in urban areas of the state, with 55.9 and 58.7 percent supportive in Tulsa and Oklahoma City respectively. A plurality of rural likely voters, 46.4 percent, supported it as well. A majority of support was also observed in every age group subset, except for those 55-64 years of age at 45.8 percent.

Support was high among those likely voters who attend church weekly or more with 59.1 percent, and 63.4 percent among self-identified evangelical voters. Both evangelicals and weekly or more church attendees make up half of the Oklahoma electorate.

Craig Eidson, pastor of Freedom Church in Piedmont, is a supporter of educational choice. “My wife and I have homeschooled, used private schooling, and had our children in the public school system,” he said. “We believe that utilizing all three methods allowed for a great education for our kids. However, it would have benefited us greatly as parents to have been able to offset the cost with an education savings account, tax break, or other means to help with the costs involved in homeschooling and private schooling. It’s a bit unfair to have to pay twice if you should choose to homeschool or use a private school. I am very excited about the prospect of school choice for everyone, especially for those who have no other way to provide alternative means of education.”

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll, and was commissioned by the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs (OCPA).

The scientific study was conducted from July 20-25, 2016 with 398 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus a online panel from Research Now. The sample was weighted by age, congressional district and gender in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election.

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.91 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Oklahoman: Changing views on death penalty?

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by Silas Allen, The Oklahoman

Just months after a grand jury report criticized Oklahoma corrections officials for a series of mix-ups and other failures in its execution process, a majority of Oklahomans say they would support abolishing the death penalty, a new poll suggests.

While more than three-quarters of those polled said they supported the death penalty, about 53 percent said they’d be willing to see the state do away with capital punishment if those who would typically be sentenced to death were instead given life sentences without the possibility of parole, forfeited all property and were ordered to pay mandatory restitution to victims’ families for the rest of their lives.

Continued – Click here to read the entire Oklahoman article

Oklahoman: Poll shows support for education tax, sentencing reform initiatives

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By Ben Felder, The Oklahoman

State questions aimed at increasing education funding and decreasing incarceration rates have strong support headed into the final few months before the November election, according to recent polls.

In cooperation with The Oklahoman, SoonerPoll found 62 percent of likely voters support State Question 779, which asks voters to approve a 1-cent sales tax increase for common and higher education, including pay raises for public school teachers.

“That may surprise some people, but it shouldn’t because we have seen in polling for some time that people want teachers to make more money, so it’s not too surprising that (SQ 779) has support,” said Bill Shapard, CEO of SoonerPoll. “I think people see this as a need that has gone long overlooked by the Legislature, and I think this state question is basically the people saying ‘If you aren’t going to do something about it, we will.’ ”

Continued – Click here to read the entire Oklahoman article

Additional Take-aways from the poll results:

Criminal Justice State Questions

  • Republicans were 15 points more likely to strongly support SQ776 (Death penalty) than Democrats and 34 points more likely than Independents. Meanwhile, Democrats 12 points more likely to strongly support SQ781 (Safety fund) than Republicans and just 2 points more likely on SQ780 (Reform criminal sentences).
  • For SQ776 (Death penalty), strong support increases from just 18.1% for liberals to 74.3% for very conservatives, and conversely decreases for SQ781 (Safety fund) from 41.9% for liberals to 23.1% for somewhat conservatives and 28.4% for very conservatives.
  • The Tulsa MSA showed the least ‘strong support’ for all three criminal justice questions, 34.2% for SQ776 compared to 47.1% for OKC MSA, 34% for SQ780 compared to 49.3% for OKC, and 26.6% for  SQ781 compared to 29.5% for OKC.
  • Strong support for SQ780 falls slightly with education level, from 54.1% (for those with some high school or less) to 35.9% for those with a post graduate degree.
  • No significant differences on levels of support among the income, employment status, or age subsets.
  • Evangelicals strongly supported SQ776 over non-evangelicals 57.6% to 38.3%, but no significant differences for SQ780 or SQ781.
  • Men strongly supported SQ776 51.5% compared to 44.3% for women, yet women strongly supported SQ780 and SQ781 by 3 and 7 points respectively over men.

SQ777 – Right To Farm

  • Most support comes from Republicans (63.3%) compared to 43.5% for Democrats and 44.5% for Independents.
  • Strong support increases along the ideological scale, from 19.8% for liberals to 41% for very conservatives.
  • Strong support in Tulsa MSA and OKC MSA is similar at 22%, but rural strong support increases to 32.9% in rural parts of the state.  Among rural voters, 22.8% were still undecided, whereas 21.4% of rural voters opposed SQ777.
  • There were no significant differences among subsets within age, education, employment status, gender, marital status or income on SQ777.
  • Among evangelical voters, 60.9% favored SQ777 as opposed to 44.4% who were not evangelical voters, plus evangelical voters were twice as likely to strongly support it.

SQ779 – Education 1-cent sales tax

  • Republicans were just as likely to support SQ779 as Democrats or Independents, 61% compared to 62.1% for Democrats and 65% for Independents.
  • No significant differences were observed in support for SQ779 in either urban or rural areas of the state.
  • Women were 14.2 points more likely to strongly support SQ779, 43.8% to 29.6% for men.
  • No other significant differences were found among subsets of any other major demographic.