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Tulsa voters not so keen on proposed Office of Independent Monitor when they find out more about the issue

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According to a quick flash poll over the weekend, a majority of likely voters in the city of Tulsa oppose the creation of a new Office of Independent Monitor in the Tulsa city government once they are given more information about how it will be created, the education of those staffing it, and how costly and duplicative it will be.

DOWNLOAD COMPLETE RESULTS: TOPLINES AND CROSSTABS

When first asked about its creation, 52.5 percent supported the idea. It should be noted however that when the question was asked, only 52.2 percent were familiar with the idea previously, of which only 13.5 percent said they were very familiar.

Once poll respondents were given more information about the proposed idea, support drops to 43.7 percent and then to 31.8 percent after a series of five more informative questions.

“Supporters of this new bureaucracy are preying upon the uninformed voter in order to find a majority of support,” said Bill Shapard, CEO of SoonerPoll.com. “They’ve positioned this issue as ‘oversight’ and ‘community outreach,’ and who wouldn’t be for that?  But, it’s more than that.”

[QUESTION] Based on everything you now know about the proposed creation of an Office of Independent Monitor, do you SUPPORT or OPPOSE the creation of this new city government office?

1. Strongly support 12.8%
2. Somewhat support 19.0
COMBINED SUPPORT 31.8
3. No opinion/Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 14.4
4. Somewhat oppose 17.1
5. Strongly oppose 36.7
COMBINED OPPOSE 53.8

Support for the proposed new Office of Independent Monitor falls to its lowest level when voters are told that the office would prohibit those with professional law enforcement training, education or experience from serving in the office.

While Democrats were more likely throughout the poll to support the proposed office, strong support fell from 47.4 percent to 26.7 percent by the end of the poll. Nearly half, 48.7 percent, of Republicans ‘strongly opposed’ the proposed new layer of city government. A combined 70.5 percent of Republicans were opposed.

Favorability of the Tulsa Police Department was also asked of poll respondents. TPD’s combined favorability was 84.6 percent, which was more than ten points higher than the mayor and more than 20 points higher than the city council. Favorability was the highest among Republicans with 92.5 percent, but even 73.9 percent of Democrats had a favorable view of the Tulsa Police.

“It’s almost as if a small angry minority of individuals unhappy with the police have a solution, yet are still in search of a problem,” said Shapard.

The Tulsa Police Internal Affairs Department, which is a department of trained police officers that are in charge of overseeing and investigating the professional misconduct of police officers, also received high marks.

A combined 54.7 percent said the Internal Affairs Department was doing an above average job. Another 28.3 percent said they were doing an average job, and only 9.3 percent said they were doing a below average job in overseeing Tulsa police officers.

Nearly 85 percent of white poll respondents felt the Internal Affairs Department was doing an average or better job, as well as 68.4 percent of African American poll respondents.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, conducted the poll of Oklahoma likely voters, which was commissioned by The Tulsa Fraternal Order of Police although the polling questions were written by SoonerPoll staff.

The scientific study was conducted September 7-8, 2019 with 320 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random in the city of Tulsa and conducted using IVR (Interactive Voice Response) technology of landline phones. The sample was weighted by age, political party and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a general election in the city of Tulsa.

The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 5.41 percentage points.

Stitt’s favorability is high, considering the current political climate.

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Governor Kevin Stitt finds himself today with about two out of every three Oklahoma likely voters having a favorable opinion of him. And, while former Republican governors in this very Republican state have had higher favorables, he might want to take his 66.5 percent favorable as a good report card considering the current political climate.

A lot can change in just six years.

In September of 2013, Oklahoma had a Republican governor at 73 percent favorable and a Democratic president with less than 30 percent favorable rating.

Now, we have the Republican governor at just 66.5 percent favorable and a Republican president at 58.3 percent. No doubt Oklahoma is still a red state and usually like its Republicans leaders, but the age of Trump has depressed those high marks for sure.

[QUESTION] Now, I’m going to read to you a list of individuals or organizations. For each one, please tell me if you have a FAVORABLE or UNFAVORABLE. If you don’t know them or have an opinion, just let me know.  KEVIN STITT

1. Very favorable 30.0%
2. Somewhat favorable 36.5
COMBINED FAVORABLE 66.5
3. No opinion/Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 16.6
4. Somewhat unfavorable 10.1
5. Very unfavorable 6.8
COMBINED UNFAVORABLE 16.9

“Stitt is doing pretty good just seven months in,” said Bill Shapard, CEO of SoonerPoll.com, who went on to note that Stitt had to follow one of the most unpopular governors in Oklahoma in modern political history from his own party.

“That, first in and of itself, was not an easy feat. He certainly could add to his favorability over time, but there will be several things that may be weighing on his ratings and one of those is next year’s presidential election.”

Stitt has the favorability of a whooping 87.3 percent of Republicans and a plurality 45.4 percent of Democrats.  Independents are less favorable towards Stitt with only 36.3 percent and 41.9 percent with an unfavorable opinion of him, yet only make up less than eight percent of the electorate.

Among conservatives, Stitt has a 85.9 percent favorable rating and nearly half of moderates at 49.9 percent. Even those that consider themselves liberal in their political views are willing to give him shot with 33.4 percent favorable. Another 21.8 percent had no opinion at this time.

“Some of these numbers could go south on Stitt also because of Medicaid expansion and how he handles it,” said Shapard.

Medicaid expansion is supported by a majority of likely voters and just about half of Republican voters with an opinion on the issue.

“Many are waiting to see,” said Shapard, who noted that 24.3 percent of Democrats had no opinion of Stitt as this time and neither did 21.8 percent of Independents.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

The scientific study was conducted from July 17-27, 2019 with 373 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus SoonerPoll’s proprietary online panel. The sample was weighted by age, political party and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a primary election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 5.07 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Trump’s favorability among Oklahomans is steady, but the polarization grows.

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For a man who up until the White House had never held public office before, Donald Trump knows how to grow his base, but he also knows how to grow his opposition as well.

In the latest SoonerPoll Quarterly of likely Oklahoma voters, Trump’s overall favorability remains relatively unchanged at 58.3 percent. In comparison, last September 59.2 percent viewed him favorable.

The movement, however, under those surface numbers is more telling.

Last September, 38.6 percent were very favorable toward him. Now, it’s 41 percent.  Then, 31.8 percent were very unfavorable toward him. Now, it’s 33.1 percent.

[QUESTION] Now, I’m going to read to you a list of individuals or organizations. For each one, please tell me if you have a FAVORABLE or UNFAVORABLE. If you don’t know them or have an opinion, just let me know.  DONALD TRUMP

1. Very favorable 41.0%
2. Somewhat favorable 17.3
COMBINED FAVORABLE 58.3
3. No opinion/Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 2.4
4. Somewhat unfavorable 6.2
5. Very unfavorable 33.1
COMBINED UNFAVORABLE 39.3

Among Republicans, Trump had a combined favorable rating of 85.1 percent last September. Now, it’s 87.5 percent. Among Democrats, Trump was seen favorable last September by 32.1 percent. Now, it’s 27.4 percent.

Oklahoma’s electoral votes next year do not appear in jeopardy for Republicans as the state continues to see the red rural areas overpower the growing blue urban areas. But, the question remains, is the loss of appeal among urban voters for Trump going to continue to hurt Republicans’ state senate and house chances?

So far, it doesn’t look like Trump is doing any favors for Oklahoma Republicans, who would like to win back an Oklahoma City congressional seat in 2020 and several Republican-majority senate and house seats that were lost in 2018.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

The scientific study was conducted from July 17-27, 2019 with 373 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus SoonerPoll’s proprietary online panel. The sample was weighted by age, political party and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a primary election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 5.07 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Medicaid expansion supported by majority of Oklahoma likely voters

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As supporters are cleared to begin collecting signatures to put Medicaid expansion on an upcoming ballot, the most recent SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll shows a majority of likely voting Oklahomans support it.

Support was extremely high with Democrats, where 57.9 percent strongly supported it and another 17.3 percent somewhat supported it, yielding a combined 75.2 percent in support. Contrast this with Republican support, 19.0 strongly supported Medicaid’s expansion in the state and another 20.8 percent somewhat supported it. While a plurality of Republicans opposed it with 41.6 percent, the level of support among Republicans was close with 39.8 percent.

While Republicans were split on the matter, Independents also supported Medicaid expansion by a large margin with 53.8 percent strongly supporting it and another 11.2 percent somewhat supporting it.

[QUESTION] Do you SUPPORT or OPPOSE the expansion of Medicaid in the state of Oklahoma?

1. Strongly support 37.8%
2. Somewhat support 18.5
COMBINED SUPPORT 56.3
3. No opinion/Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 16.0
4. Somewhat oppose 10.5
5. Strongly oppose 17.2
COMBINED OPPOSE 27.7

As expected, self-identified liberal voters were heavily supportive with 89.9 percent strongly in support and another 5.8 percent were in somewhat support.

Self-identified conservatives were more opposed than in support of the measure. Forty-six percent opposed it and 32.6 percent supported it. Interestingly, one-in-five conservatives were undecided on the issue, the largest amount among any of the ideological subsets. Moderates supported it 78.6 percent to only 10.9 percent that opposed it.

It should be noted as well that, among those who had a favorable opinion of Governor Stitt, 43.6 percent supported Medicaid expansion in the state; only 37.7 percent opposed it.

No significant differences among subsets in age, education, race or household income were observed.

While a slim majority of men supported Medicaid expansion in the state at 51.9 percent, women were nearly 15 points more likely to support it.

Lastly, the poll also asked the same question of support or oppose Medicaid expansion while providing the poll respondent with additional information, noting the incomes of those that would qualify for Medicaid and the cost to the state government for its portion of the overall cost.

The question produced little difference in overall result compared to the first question outlined above. Combined support for Medicaid expansion was 55.7 percent, compared to 56.3 percent for the initial question. Those undecided did drop when more information was provided, from 16 percent to 9.6 percent.  Those opposed rose from 27.7 percent to 34.8 percent.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

The scientific study was conducted from July 17-27, 2019 with 373 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus SoonerPoll’s proprietary online panel. The sample was weighted by age, political party and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a primary election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 5.07 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Poll: What projects do OKC voters want in MAPS4? The results may surprise you.

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Since nearly 62 percent of special-election, likely voting Oklahoma City residents support a continuation of the MAPS 1-cent sales tax that will probably be on the ballot late this year, the real question has been what types of projects do voters want.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE COMPLETE REPORT

Those leading the charge for a professional soccer stadium will be disappointed in the results since a proposed $70-90 million downtown stadium was the least popular of all of the projects that were tested.

Surprisingly, the most popular project was one far less glitzy than convention centers and soccer stadiums: mental health and substance abuse facilities. The results should not be totally unexpected as recent media reports have shown that the county jail’s biggest problems are dealing with mental health and substance abuse issues.

In 2016, voters passed criminal justice reforms, making some non-violent felonies into misdemeanors, but has not dealt with the potential untreated mental health and substance abuse issues.

“Voters may want to see the MAPS invested in mental health and substance abuse facilities because they’re not seeing anything being done to solve the problems at the Oklahoma County Jail,” said Bill Shapard, CEO of the SoonerPoll.

[QUESTION] Now, I’m going to read to you several projects for a MAPS4 continuation of the MAPS sales tax. For each one, please tell me whether you SUPPORT or OPPOSE that particular project being included in a MAPS4 bundle of projects. 

Mental health and substance abuse facilities.

1. Strongly support 62.3%
2. Somewhat support 20.9
COMBINED SUPPORT 83.2
3. No opinion/Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 4.1
4. Somewhat oppose 5.3
5. Strongly oppose 7.4
COMBINED OPPOSE 12.7

Investments in city parks with restroom facilities and athletic complexes and equipment for children and adults was the next most popular project among those offered to poll respondents.

“In speaking with city staff over the years, my understanding is that the most common request of city residents to our parks department is to address restroom facilities which are only present in one percent of city parks,” said former city councilor Ed Shadid.

Establishing protected bike lanes and improvements to the bus system, including new buses and bus shelters, were the next two most popular projects.

Also receiving majority support was a fund to help bridge the gap in financing historic preservation projects.

The poll results also showed that voters, by a wide margin, want to vote for each of the proposed MAPS projects separately rather than in a package as an all or nothing vote.  Seventy-nine percent favored the up or down on each proposed project on the ballot and only 16.3 percent wanted a package of projects.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, conducted the poll and it was commissioned by former city councilor Ed Shadid.

The scientific study was conducted from April 24 – May 9, 2019 with 406 likely voters selected at random in the city of Oklahoma City from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus SoonerPoll’s proprietary online panel. The sample was weighted by age and congressional district in order to reflect the likely voter population of Oklahoma City for a special election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of Oklahoma City likely voters. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.85 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Oklahoma City voters want some of the MAPS4 tax spent on operations and maintenance of city park and transit

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Oklahoma City voters like the MAPS sales taxes and the projects that are making a positive impact on the city, but according to the latest poll, voters want to see the upcoming MAPS4 monies also spent on the operations and maintenance of these capital projects, as well as city parks and the city transit system.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE COMPLETE REPORT

Fifty-seven percent of likely special-election city voters supported operations and maintenances costs being included in any future MAPS4 proposal, including 57.3 percent of Republicans and 61.7 percent of Independents.

When asked how any MAPS4 monies should be spent a few questions later in the survey, nearly half (47.9 percent) wanted at least half spent on the operations and maintenance of the MAPS projects like the new Scissortail Park and the downtown streetcar. Another 21.6 percent wanted to spend a quarter of new monies on operations and maintenance, meaning 69.5 percent of city likely voters want to spend a quarter or more of any future MAPS4 monies on operations and maintenance.

Only 13.9 percent wanted to spend the full MAPS penny on new capital projects only.

“While the public is clearly in the mood to provide improvements in parks, transit, mental health, homelessness and biking infrastructure,” said former city councilor Ed Shadid upon reviewing the poll results, “they also overwhelming seem to realize that it is financially irresponsible to build things without having a funding source to provide for the operations and maintenance of those investments.”

[QUESTION] In the MAPS3 program, the roughly $800 million collected from the 1-cent sales tax has gone towards building things or capital spending with none of the money dedicated towards operations and maintenance costs. Once the MAPS3 projects are built, the new operations and maintenance costs are almost exclusively paid from the city’s existing general budget. For example, the streetcar costs are approximately $3 million per year to operate and the new downtown park will cost $3-4 million per year to operate. Knowing this, do you SUPPORT or OPPOSE reserving a portion of the 1-cent MAPS tax to pay operations and maintenance costs?

1. Strongly support 33.8%
2. Somewhat support 23.3
COMBINED SUPPORT 57.1
3. No opinion/Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 9.2
4. Somewhat oppose 12.2
5. Strongly oppose 21.5
COMBINED OPPOSE 33.7

When likely voters were asked about increased funding for city parks and transit system, a large majority supported monies being spent to not only operate and maintain these city resources but also to improve facilities and increased transit hours and amenities.

Sixty-nine percent of likely voters supported a 1/8-cent sales tax for city park operations with the addition of better restrooms, and activities for children and adults including athletic complexes.  Nearly sixty percent supported a 1/8-cent sales tax in the operations and maintenance of the city transit system, including greater frequency of service, expanded hours to include evenings and weekends, and quality bus shelters.

When voters were informed that Oklahoma City spends 28 percent of what a typical midwestern city spends on park maintenance, including the city’s low ranking among other cities, 59.6 percent were more likely to support a 1/8-cent sale tax for the city’s parks.

Also, once likely voters were informed that the new Scissortail Park would cost 3-4 million dollars to operate and maintain, and that these monies would have to come out of an already overburdened parks budget that struggles to maintain the current 6,000 acres of parks throughout the city’s neighborhoods, 57.9 percent were more likely to support a 1/8-cent dedicated funding source for the city’s parks.

An even greater amount, 64 percent, were also more likely to support a portion of the MAPS4 monies on the city’s public transit system once learning that Oklahoma City was the largest city in America, during the MAPS3 funding, without public bus transportation on Sundays and in the evenings.

Former city councilors Sam Bowman and Pete White also had a chance to comment on the poll results.

“Efforts made in previous years at improving public transit in OKC through improving frequency and routes of our bus system has been too slow,” Bowman said. “We are losing time and getting further and further behind; change has been too graduated and having a dedicated funding source for transit operations will get us there.”

“The poll results confirm my long held belief that the most transformative project that OKC can undertake is ‘Big League’ attention to existing OKC parks,” said White. “Quality maintenance and programming in our parks is essential to the quality of life the citizens of OKC want and deserve.”

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, conducted the poll and it was commissioned by former city councilor Ed Shadid.

The scientific study was conducted from April 24 – May 9, 2019 with 406 likely voters selected at random in the city of Oklahoma City from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus SoonerPoll’s proprietary online panel. The sample was weighted by age and congressional district in order to reflect the likely voter population of Oklahoma City for a special election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of Oklahoma City likely voters. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.85 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Allowing Oklahomans to live independently in their home has high support in recent poll

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Oklahoma likely voters support legislation if it means helping some Oklahomans live in their own homes as opposed to a nursing home, according to the last SoonerPoll Quarterly.

Slightly more than half strongly supported the required legislation to better implement these alternatives.  Another 34.7 percent somewhat supported them.

[QUESTION] The state and federal governments pay the full cost of care for the majority of nursing home patients. There are often less costly alternatives to nursing home stays, such as programs that allow Oklahomans to live independently in their own home, but would require legislative action to better implement these alternatives.  Would you SUPPORT or OPPOSE legislation that encouraged better implementation of these less costly alternatives?

1. Strongly support 51.3%
2. Somewhat support 34.7
COMBINED SUPPORT 86.0
3. No opinion/Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 8.7
4. Somewhat oppose 3.9
5. Strongly oppose 1.4
COMBINED OPPOSE 5.3

The idea has broad-based support throughout the poll results.

Among Republicans, 47.7 percent strongly support the legislation and another 36.7 percent somewhat supported it. Strong support was slightly higher with Democrats and Independents with 54.8 percent of Democrats and 56.1 percent of Independents.

Support was also strong all along the ideological spectrum with 86.9 percent of liberals in support, 88.9 percent of moderates and 85.1 percent of conservatives.

Strong support was also observed among voters with all levels of education, age, and  income.

Respondents in the poll were also asked if they supported or opposed antipsychotic medications being dispensed to nursing home residents without a psychiatric diagnosis. Nearly three fourths, or 74.4 percent, of likely voting Oklahomans supported legislation that would require nursing home patients to first have a psychiatric diagnosis before receiving antipsychotic medications.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll, and were commissioned by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP).

The scientific study was conducted from December 17-28, 2018 with 400 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus SoonerPoll’s proprietary online panel. The sample was weighted by age, political party, sex and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a primary election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.9 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Homebuyer savings accounts very popular with Oklahoma voters, particularly those younger

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In an effort to make home ownership feasible for more Oklahomans, Homebuyer Savings Accounts have become popular in others states, and Oklahoma voters strongly support them according to the most recent SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll.

Over eighty percent of likely voting Oklahomans support legislation that would create homebuyer savings accounts, where perspective homebuyers could save monies to be used for a down payment or closing costs, receiving a state income tax deduction on any gains.

[QUESTION]A homebuyer’s savings account allows individuals or couples to save money in a dedicated savings account that can be used for a down payment and closing costs toward the purchase of a future home. Parents and grandparents can also contribute to the savings account. Those that contribute receive a state income tax deduction on interest gains. Knowing this, would you SUPPORT or OPPOSE legislation that create homebuyer savings accounts?

1. Strongly support 41.8%
2. Somewhat support 38.5
COMBINED SUPPORT 80.3
3. No opinion/Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 9.4
4. Somewhat oppose 6.3
5. Strongly oppose 4.0
COMBINED OPPOSE 10.3

Also in the poll, 45 percent of Oklahomans identified affordability or adequate income as the biggest obstacle right now them in buying a new home.  Another 26 percent said they couldn’t afford the down payment, which was the second biggest obstacle.

Of those age 25 to 34, 36 percent said they couldn’t afford the down payment, and 40 percent of those age 35 to 44 said they couldn’t as well. This was the top issue for those under the age of 44 who are those mostly likely needing to buy a new home.

“We need to help young Oklahomans to be able to buy a home,” said Jessica Hickok, Chief Executive Officer of the Oklahoma Association of Realtors©, “and homebuyer savings accounts are a great way to solve this problem.”

Nearly four in ten poll respondents between the ages of 25 and 34 said they would be likely to take advantage of a homebuyer savings account if they could, and an overwhelming 73 percent of those between the ages of 35 and 44 said they were as well.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll, and were commissioned by the Oklahoma Association of Realtors.

The scientific study was conducted from December 17-28, 2018 with 400 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus SoonerPoll’s proprietary online panel. The sample was weighted by age, political party, sex and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a primary election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.9 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Buying prescription drugs from Canada? Now, more Oklahomans support it.

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The idea of buying prescription drugs from Canada has been discussed for a long time, but still Oklahomans are not legally able.  SoonerPoll tested the idea just last year, and now — according to the most recent SoonerPoll Quarterly — even more Oklahomans support measure than last year.

About this same time last year, 70 percent supported the idea of legally purchasing prescription drugs from Canada. Now, over 75 percent do.

[QUESTION] Currently, US law bans people from buying most prescription drugs from Canada. Some people believe that the laws should be changed to allow Americans to buy prescription drugs from Canada as long as they are just as safe and effective as those bought in the U.S. Knowing this, do you SUPPORT or OPPOSE state legislation that would allow the purchase of prescription drugs from Canada?

1. Strongly support 45.6%
2. Somewhat support 30.1
COMBINED SUPPORT 75.7
3. No opinion/Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 11.5
4. Somewhat oppose 5.6
5. Strongly oppose 7.2
COMBINED OPPOSE 12.8

There is no divide among Oklahoma likely voters on this issue, as Republicans and Democrats, liberals and conservatives, and the young and old all support the measure.

Seventy-seven percent of Republicans support it, as well as 76.3 percent of Democrats and 58.1 percent of Independents.

Eighty-seven percent of liberals support it, as well as 73.4 percent of conservatives and 77 percent of Independents.

Seventy-six percent of likely voters with just a high school degree supported it, just as 78.6 percent of likely voters with a post graduate degree.

Youngers voter were more likely to not have an opinion on the idea in comparison to older voters, but still 61 percent of those under the age of 34 supported the legal purchase of prescription drugs from Canada. Seventy-eight percent of those over the age of 65 supported it.

No significant opposition was observed in any other demographic group.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll, and were commissioned by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP).

The scientific study was conducted from December 17-28, 2018 with 400 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus SoonerPoll’s proprietary online panel. The sample was weighted by age, political party, sex and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a primary election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.9 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.

Oklahomans see nurse practitioners as strong option to address potential primary care physician shortage

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It’s been suggested that Oklahoma could be facing a primary care physician shortage, particularly in rural areas. One possible solution currently being utilized in other states is the use of nurse practitioners (NPs) as a patient’s primary care provider as more and more graduating doctors specialize in more advanced areas of medicine.

Over 80 percent of likely voting Oklahomans support this solution, according to the most recent SoonerPoll Quarterly.

[QUESTION] Healthcare experts estimate that by 2025, there will not be enough primary care providers to handle the increasing number of patients who are seeking routine healthcare services, especially in rural Oklahoma. Twenty-three (23) states have passed a proposal that would allow nurse practitioners—registered nurses with advanced training who often visit older people in their homes—to serve as the primary or acute care providers of record for a patient. Knowing this, do you SUPPORT or OPPOSE allowing nurse practitioners serving as primary care providers?

1. Strongly support 40.9%
2. Somewhat support 39.3
COMBINED SUPPORT 80.2
3. No opinion/Don’t know/Refused [DNR] 8.8
4. Somewhat oppose 6.3
5. Strongly oppose 4.7
COMBINED OPPOSE 11.0

The idea has broad-based support throughout the poll results.

Among Republicans, 82.4 percent support NPs acting as primary care providers, as do 78.6 percent of Democrats. Seventy-four percent of Independents supported it as well.

Support was also strong all along the ideological spectrum with 76.8 percent of liberals in support, 83.3 percent of Independents and 81.1 percent of conservatives.

Strong support was also observed among voters with all levels of education, age, and  income.

Eighty percent of men supported the measure and 79.1 percent of women.

About the Poll

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma’s public opinion pollster, asked these questions of Oklahoma likely voters as part of the SoonerPoll Quarterly Poll, and were commissioned by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP).

The scientific study was conducted from December 17-28, 2018 with 400 likely Oklahoma voters selected at random statewide from a tri-frame of both landline telephone and cell phones, plus SoonerPoll’s proprietary online panel. The sample was weighted by age, political party, sex and congressional district in order to reflect the Oklahoma likely voter population for a primary election. The weighting was conducted using a ‘layered technique.’

The sample reflects the traditional demographical profile of the Oklahoma likely voter with roughly half of respondents identifying as conservative and attending religious services once or more per week. The study has a Margin of Error (MoE) of ± 4.9 percent.

This poll not only conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls but exceeds the standard disclosure with a Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report. A complete description of the methodology can be found here.

The poll’s Call Disposition and Rate Calculation Report can be viewed here.  A beta version of the Weighting Table Report can be viewed here.